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Car Parts List: A Concise Guide to Replacement and Components

Cars have always been complicated machines. Over time, they’ve become even more complex. Regardless, as a car owner, it is necessary to at the very least have an idea of the important parts of your car and their respective functions.

  • to notice and spot issues
  • carry out effective routine maintenance and basic DIY repairs
  • converse intelligibly with your mechanic and not look bemused when s/he is trying to explain things to you

But before we get on to the auto parts list, there are a few…

Important things to note

Diversity

An auto part in your car is not exactly the same as an auto part of the same name in another car. A specific car part would have multiple configurations over different trims, models, model years, and marque. Yet have roughly the same function.

Obviously, we wouldn’t go into each configuration type in this guide. Rather, we’d concern ourselves with the general makeup of a part and what it does. You could use this database to lookup specific components or parts of your car, complete with part numbers and descriptions.

Complexity

Following on from the previous entry, parts aren’t only diverse; they also have varying degrees of complexity. A spark plug, for example, is a lot more basic than the brake system.

The transmission system, which you would be correct to regard as a part, has tens of sub-components. Ideally, you wouldn’t be interested in learning about these sub-components. That’s why there are auto mechanics.

Keeping things simple

This list is by no means exhaustive. There are hundreds of parts and sub-parts in your car. But if you are here, you prolly aren’t training to be a mechanic. You are only looking to know more about your car.

Which is why we are sticking to the essential car parts. And we aren’t going to bog you down with geek-speak and complicated technicalities.

With that said, let’s get down to the list.

29 Main Car Parts Explained: Guide, List, Functions

Electrical and Electronics

1. Battery

Photo Source: https://www.groupon.ae/deals/dial-a-battery

System

Part of the electrical supply system.

Other name

SLI (starting-lighting-ignition) battery.

What does it do?

As you’d have guessed, the battery starts the engine. That’s its main purpose, but it’s got a few others:

  • Fill in (providing extra power) when your car’s electrical requirements (for stuff like the wiper or music player) exceeds supply from the alternator
  • Acts as a stabilizer to even out dangerous voltage spikes

What could go wrong?

The worst really. You jump in your car, try to fire it up, and it wouldn’t start. More likely than not, your battery is at fault. A battery could go flat, in which case it’s possible to jump start your car with the battery of another vehicle or a portable battery booster. Then have your running car charge your flat battery.

The fix for other scenarios isn’t always that simple. Some common other problems include:

  • Corrosion and stains (typically observed at the terminals) indicative of a leak; and may cause broken internal connections or plates
  • Sulfation - the battery emits awful rotten egg smell
  • Damage to the terminals or battery case
  • Short-circuited cell(s)
  • Low fluid (electrolyte) volume

How long does it last?

Anywhere between two and five years. Contingent mainly on where you live and how well you care for it.

2. Spark plug

Photo Credit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_xGFfketcs

System

Part of the ignition electronic system.

What does it do?

It pretty much creates the ignition (spark) that kicks off combustion in your car’s engine.

What could go wrong?

  • General wear and tear of the electrodes
  • Contamination from improper fueling or oil leaks
  • Deposit buildup
  • Expanding gap

How long does it last?

On average, and depending on manufacturer specifications, you should replace your spark plug after approximately 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers).

3. Ignition coil

Photo: https://www.boschautoparts.com/en/auto/ignition-parts/ignition-coils

System

Part of the ignition electronic system.

Other name

Spark coil.

What does it do?

The ignition coil boosts the tiny voltage your battery supplies (typically 12 volts) to the high voltage required by the spark plug (up to 30,000 volts) to create an ignition (spark). If you’re familiar with high school physics, the ignition coil acts as a [high voltage] transformer.

What could go wrong?

  • General wear with time
  • Damage due to heat and moisture
  • Contamination from leaking fluid

A faulty ignition coil shares much of the same symptoms as other components in the ignition electronic system such as:

  • Misfiring or backfiring
  • Car failing to start
  • Frequent stalling - a faulty ignition coil causing the spark plug to ignite irregularly, often leading to a shut-down when your car stops
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    Lower than normal power

How long does it last?

On average, you should need a new ignition coil after 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers). Because many modern cars use a system consisting of multiple ignition coils called an ignition coil pack, you may find that you have to replace an entire pack instead of individual faulty or damaged coils.

4. Distributor

Photo Source: http://desaiauto.com/product-gallary/automobile-products/distributor/

System

Part of the ignition electronic system.

What does it do?

The primary function of the ignition system distributor is to direct the high voltage from the ignition coil to the spark plugs in the correct firing order, and for the right amount of time.

It may also have an inductive or mechanical breaker switch that opens and closes the ignition coil’s primary circuit. The circuit permits or stops the flow of current to the ignition coil.

What could go wrong?

  • Faults in the distributor cap - often due to buildup of dirt, oil, corrosive material, or sludge
  • General wear

How long does it last?

The parts of an ignition system distributor that often require changing are the distributor cap and rotor.

You’d typically have to replace a bad distributor cap and rotor after 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers). Many a time, proper maintenance goes a long way to stretching longevity of the parts. And visible signs of premature distributor failure may simply be solved by cleaning the cap with sandpaper.

That said, most modern cars do not have distributors. Instead opting for direct ignition or remote distributorless ignition.

5. Alternator

Photo: http://www.samarins.com/glossary/alternator.html

System

Part of the charging system.

What does it do?

So, you know the battery supplies the voltage that starts your engine. But what powers the electrical components in your car—light, wipers, windows, stereo, air conditioning, etc?

Yup, you guessed right - the alternator. It gets its name from alternating current, which it generates to power your car’s electrical systems and to charge your battery.

To put it simply, the battery starts the car, while the alternator keeps it running.

What could go wrong?

  • Worn, slipping, or loose belt
  • Collapsed, seized, worn out or broken bearing
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    Faulty pulleys
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    Broken mounting or casing (housing)
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    Internal alternator component(s) failure—faulty rectifiers, worn slip rings and brushes, damaged windings

How long does it last?

The lifespan of alternators vary. And sometimes, you may have to change specific parts in the alternator, such as a failed rotor bearing, without having to replace the alternator completely.

You should expect to get anywhere between 40,000 miles (64,300 kilometers) to 150,000 miles (241,400 kilometers) before changing your alternator.

6. Thermostat

Photo Source: https://gobdp.com/blog/why-is-my-car-over-heating/

Category

Electrical switches.

What does it do?

It regulates the temperature of your car’s engine. Keeping it at or near a specific optimal temperature (setpoint); generally around 200°F (95°C).

Thus, it helps your engine warm up quickly to desired temperature (by closing the valve to restrict the flow of coolant), whilst also preventing your engine from overheating after attaining the desired temperature (by opening the valve to allow the flow of coolant).

What could go wrong? 

It fails. Often unexpectedly.

When it fails, it will get stuck at either the open or closed position. Neither is good, but you’d notice something’s wrong faster if it’s stuck in the closed position.

Regardless of its state when it gives out, replacing it is not up for debate. The last thing you want is to run your car on a bad thermostat. You’d practically damage your engine within minutes.

How long does it last?

Pretty hard to predict. It typically lasts for several years, and in some cases, the entire lifetime of the car.

7. Oxygen sensor

Photo: https://www.my-cardictionary.com/electronics/oxygen-sensor-1.html

Category

Sensors. Part of the emissions control system.

Other name

O2 sensor, lambda sensor.

What does it do?

  • Helps ensure that the engine runs efficiently; by passing along key data that effectively regulates fuel injection
  • Helps limit exhaust emission

What could go wrong?

  • Mainly failure when nearing the end of its lifespan; however, it may fail prematurely for several reasons
  • Contamination and age may also cause inaccurate readings

How long does it last?

The two main types of O2 sensors have different lifespans. Unheated sensors would give out after about 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers) to 50,000 miles (80,400 kilometers). Heated sensors last longer, and on average, could go strong for up to 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

It is worth noting that most modern cars have multiple (up to four) oxygen sensors.

Powertrain and Chassis

8. Brake

Credit: http://www.trdusa.com/brakes.html

System

Part of the braking system.

What does it do?

Slow or stop a car in motion.

What could go wrong?

A lot really, as the braking system is extensive with many different parts. Each of which is a possible fault point.

You could have a damaged brake rotor, worn out brake pad, a sticking brake caliper, or a dozen other brake issues. It is essential to carry out regular maintenance, stay vigilant, and reach out to your mechanic when you notice something is off.

How long does it last?

Most modern cars have brakes on all four wheels. They may all be disc brakes, drum brakes, or a mix of the two types (usually disc brakes on the front wheels and drum brakes on the rear wheels).

Furthermore, the lifespan of brake components depends on a couple of factors—environment (for instance, you’d change brake parts more often in a city than out in the country), driving habit, build material, amongst others.

Because of the many different configurations, parts, and use cases, it is unlikely that you’d have to overhaul your entire braking system. More often than not, you’d be replacing specific brake parts. The most common being:

  • Brake pad - with average lifespan range of 25,000 miles (40,200 kilometers) to 70,000 miles (112,600 kilometers); but may give way after only about 15,000 miles (24,100 kilometers)
  • Brake rotor - with average lifespan range of 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers) to 70,000 miles (112,600 kilometers)
  • Brake fluid - that needs changing after every 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers) on average

9. Transmission

System

Part of the transmission system.

Other name

Gearbox.

What does it do?

As the name suggests, it transmits energy (power or torque) generated in the engine to the wheels for movement.

What could go wrong?

Quite a number of things could go wrong with your transmission. And most of them depend on the type of transmission system in your car (for example, worn gear synchronizers only affect manual transmission systems).

The two major transmission types are manual and automatic. But there are other types such as semi-automatic, continuously variable transmission (CVT), dual clutch, etc.

  • Leaking or low transmission fluid level
  • Broken or worn out gears
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    Complications from not changing the transmission fluid regularly; such as a clogged transmission line

How long does it last?

Like with the braking system, you’d most like only have to replace specific gearbox parts from time to time, say a transmission solenoid. Although, after 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers), it becomes increasingly likely that you would have to do shell out cash for a complete tranny replacement.

The component you’d change more often is the transmission fluid. You’d have to follow manufacturer’s recommendations, as the widely quoted mileage limit of 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers) doesn’t apply to all cars.

10. Clutch

Photo: https://eagletransmission.com/the-importance-of-clutch-for-your-vehicle-s-transmission-system

System

Part of the transmission system.

What does it do?

Its major function is to ensure smooth changing of gears.

What could go wrong?

It depends on the type of transmission system.

In manual systems, the following problems may occur:

  • Worn out clutch components, such as the pressure plate, clutch disc, throw-out bearing
  • Warped or cracked flywheel
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    Leaking master or slave cylinder (in hydraulic clutch types)

In automatic systems, the main issue is often worn clutch discs or plates.

How long does it last?

For manual transmission cars, there doesn’t seem to be a consensus on the expected longevity of the clutch. Depending on whom you ask, the lifespan figure thrown at you could be between 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers) and over 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

The fact to note is that the longevity of your clutch depends a great deal on your driving habit. If you drive properly and not often place unnecessary demands on your clutch, you should get above 50,000 miles (80,400 kilometers) before it wears out.

When it’s time to replace though, you could be looking at changing only specific components—usually the clutch plate or just installing a new clutch.

The story is a lot different for clutches in automatic transmission cars. Firstly, auto transmission cars have multiple clutches called clutch packs. Therefore, when it’s time to replace a faulty clutch, you’ll always have to replace the entire pack.

One reason for this is that the clutches in a pack all wear out at about the same time. And (this is also the second point about clutches in automatic transmission cars), getting into the transmission requires a ton of labor. Which is why mechanics rarely ever change only the clutch pack if it goes bad. They typically rebuild the transmission and replace any other part that may be nearing the end of its lifespan.

There’s a silver lining though. Because of the design and mode of operation, clutches in automatic transmission cars usually last for at least 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

11. Drive shaft

Credit: http://www.westerndiff.com/drive-shafts

System

Part of the transmission system.

Other names

Propeller (prop) shaft, driveshaft, Cardan shaft, driving shaft.

What does it do?

It connects the transmission to the rear differential (the last stop before torque moves to the wheels) in a front-engine, rear-wheel drive car.

What could go wrong?

  • Damaged u-joint (universal joint)
  • Failed center support bearing
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    Leaking master or slave cylinder (in hydraulic clutch types)

How long does it last?

The average lifespan of the prop-shaft is 75,000 miles (120,700 kilometers).

12. Axle

Photo: https://repairpal.com/estimator/front-axle-replacement-cost

System

Part of the suspension and steering systems.

Other names

Axle shaft, CV (constant velocity) shaft, CV axle.

What does it do?

It transmits torque from the differential to your wheels.

What could go wrong?

  • Failed CV joint​​​​
  • Leaking (torn) axle (rubber) boots (also called a CV gaiter)
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    Broken axle

How long does it last?

The axle doesn’t exactly have a set lifespan. It should function correctly throughout the life of the car. But, should the rubber boot tear or the axle fail due to general wear and tear, you would have to replace the axle assembly.

Replacing the specific bad axle component, say the leaking rubber boot and filling it up with grease, is an option. But, it is likely that in the time that the boot has been torn, some level of damage may have occurred to the shaft joint. Which pretty much implies that the joint will go out sooner than usual.

Coupled with the small difference in cost of replacement parts and labor, mechanics often advice replacing the entire axle assembly whenever you have an issue with your axle.

That said, on average, an axle should last around 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

13. Piston

Credit: http://www.enginebasics.com/Engine%20Basics%20Root%20Folder/Pistons.html

System

Part of the engine.

What does it do?

Transfers force from the expanding gas to the crankshaft, which in turn feeds power to the transmission.

What could go wrong?

  • Usually inevitable wear and tear; often affecting the piston rings first
  • Seized, burned out, broken piston; resulting in piston failure
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    Shattered piston skirt
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    Snapped piston rod

How long does it last?

A really long time. Piston damage typically only occurs after your engine racks up lots of miles—more than 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers). Even then, you may only need to replace the piston ring, especially when you notice bluish gray smoke from your exhaust.

Any replacement, whether of a specific piston part or the whole piston, would require an engine teardown. And with many instances of piston damage also implying damage to other parts (or at least the likelihood that other parts may need changing), piston replacement often means engine rebuilding.

14. Fuel pump

System

Part of the fuel supply system.

What does it do?

Sends fuel at proper pressure and quality from the gas tank to the fuel injector (or carburetor, in older cars).

What could go wrong?

  • Oxidized fuel pump relay; in electric (electronic) pumps
  • Fuel pump failure

Credit: https://repairpal.com/fuel-pump

How long does it last?

In general, a fuel pump can last for the life of your car. But this isn’t often the case, as they’re not always properly maintained. A common bad practice is to run the fuel tank too low before refilling.

On average, it should last at least 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

15. Fuel injector

Photo: http://www.neweraperformanceparts.com/index.php/fuel-injector-service

System

Part of the fuel supply system.

What does it do?

It directs (actually, sprays) fuel into the combustion chamber (where combustion—burning of a mix of fuel and air—occurs) of each cylinder (which contains the piston).

What could go wrong?

A fuel injector may:

  • become dirty
  • become clogged
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    fail to open or close
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    leak

How long does it last?

Anywhere between 50,000 miles (80,400 kilometers) and 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

In general, a fuel injector on the fritz doesn’t necessarily have to be replaced. Cleaning it could be a fix. If it isn’t, then you’d likely only have to replace the faulty injector(s) (modern cars have a one fuel injector per engine cylinder setup).

16. Air filter

dirty air filter

System

Part of the fuel supply system.

What does it do?

It captures particles in the air that goes into the combustion chamber. You shouldn’t confuse the engine air filter with the cabin air filter.

What could go wrong?

It becomes clogged and dirty.

How long does it last?

On average, your engine air filter will last for between 6,000 miles (9,600 kilometers) to 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers). Most manufacturers’ replacement recommendations hover around 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers). Chevrolet even recommends changing after 45,000 miles (72,400 kilometers) on most of its engines.

Ultimately, how long your air filter stays in top shape boils down to your driving conditions. You’d get lower mileage if you explore dirt roads often.

If you don’t drive often, then you shouldn’t wait to rack up to 30,000 miles (48,200 kilometers) before replacing it. After three years, the efficacy of an air filter dips. And it’d be necessary to install a new air filter.

17. Radiator

Source: http://www.mycarhurts.com/radiator-repair

System

Part of the engine cooling system.

What does it do?

It cools hot coolant coming from the engine before routing it back to the engine.

What could go wrong?

  • Rusting and corrosion
  • Leaking
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    Mineral deposits (sediment or gunk accumulation)
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    Overheating

How long does it last?

You should get years out of your radiator (around a decade on average). In older cars, radiators last for the life of the car, hitting up to three decades in select cases.

18. Engine fan

Photo: http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-911-technical-forum/568145-straw-colored-finish-engine-fan-2.html

System

Part of the engine cooling system.

Other names

Engine cooling fan, cooling fan, radiator fan, radiator cooling fan.

What does it do?

It pulls in air that:

  • cools the coolant in the radiator
  • helps cools the engine directly

What could go wrong?

  • Faulty mechanical fan clutch
  • Bad electric fan motor
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    Faulty electronic fan controls—sensor, relay, fuse (or fusible link), or switch

How long does it last?

Pinning down the average longevity of a radiator fan is hard. This is because the fan’s components (clutch, motor, relay, et cetera) may fail at different times and you’d have to replace each as they fail.

Replacing the entire fan assembly isn’t always necessary.

19. Water pump

Photo Credit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAxMGtkopTc

System

Part of the engine cooling system.

What does it do?

It circulates the coolant between the engine (where the coolant absorbs heat) and the radiator (where the coolant dissipates heat). You could call it the heart of the engine cooling system.

What could go wrong?

  • Water pump gaskets and seals cracking or breaking, often leading to coolant leakage
  • Loose water pump pulley
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    Worn out water pump bearings
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    Rusty (for steel types) or worn out (for plastic types) water pump impeller

How long does it last?

Barring any premature failure of components (gaskets, seals, bearings, etc), you should replace a mechanical water pump (driven by a timing belt) when the timing belt fails. On average, a timing belt would serve you for 100,000+ miles (160,900 kilometers).

Chances are your car uses a mechanical water pump. Only a few cars, such as the BMW 3 series post-2006 and some hybrid cars, use electric water pumps. And there are a few engines, like the Volkswagen W12, that use both.

Electronic water pumps have about the same lifespan as mechanical water pumps. But for the few notable advantages over mechanical water pumps, they notoriously kiss the dust without warning, unlike mechanical water pumps.

20. Power steering pump

Credit: http://www.bn-pump.com/pid10288334/Power+Steering+Pump+For+Opel.htm

System

Part of the suspension and steering systems.

What does it do?

It pressurizes the power steering fluid to help you turn the steering wheel.

What could go wrong?

  • Leaks
  • Worn out pump bearings
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    General failure

How long does it last?

The power steering pump should go strong for at least 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers). When you notice issues, you may replace (often recommended) or rebuild it.

The power steering pump is but one part of the power steering system (PAS or steering assist system). And sometimes, you may have to change a few other parts in the system when replacing the power steering pump. This is in addition to filling up the newly installed pump with power steering fluid.

Some modern cars use electric PS systems and do not have pumps.

21. Shock absorber

Photo: https://www.carscope.com/shock-absorber-replacement-interval-myths/

System

Part of the suspension and steering systems.

Other name

Damper, shock.

What does it do?

  • It helps absorbs and dampens shock impulses by controlling the movement of suspension and springs
  • It ensures that your tires stay in contact with the ground at all times

What could go wrong?

  • General wear
  • Ruptured seal

How long does it last?

Anywhere between 80,000 miles (128,700 kilometers) and 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

22. Ball joint

Photo Credit: https://www.kustom1warehouse.net/Lower_ball_joints_for_VW_p/lowerballjoints.htm

System

Part of the suspension and steering systems.

What does it do?

It connects the control arm to the steering knuckles, and in so doing, acts as a pivot between the wheels and the suspension. As a pivot, it allows the wheel to turn whilst also permitting the suspension to move up and down.

Technically, it is said to allow movement in two planes, and if necessary, at the same time. Much like the ball and socket joint in your shoulder, from which it gets its name.

What could go wrong?

General wear and tear as it ages.

How long does it last?

The longevity of a ball joint is between 70,000 miles (112,600 kilometers) and 150,000 miles (241,400 kilometers).

23. Muffler

Source: http://www.norcalmuffler.com/muffler-and-exhaust-systems/

System

Part of the exhaust system.

Other name

Silencer.

What does it do?

  • reduces the noise emitted by the exhaust to make it tolerable
  • direct exhaust emissions away from the vehicle
  • arrow-circle-right
    helps ensure smooth running of your car by regulating flow of emissions out of your car

What could go wrong?

  • Rust is the main issue
  • Cracks or holes

How long does it last?

Estimates are all over the place. Depending on whom you ask, you may get a 2-4 years on average reply—around 40,000 (64,300 kilometers) to 80,000 miles (128,700 kilometers); or 6-15 years reply—certainly above 100,000 miles (160,900 kilometers).

24. Catalytic converter

Source: http://www.nwitimes.com/news/opinion/forum/scrappers-drive-catalytic-converter-thefts/article_c3096060-87f9-559b-82b8-df6fd5bd072b.html

System

Part of the exhaust and emission control systems.

Other name

Cat.

What does it do?

It converts toxic exhaust emissions (gases and pollutants) into less harmful gases before they’re released into the environment.

What could go wrong?

  • Overheating
  • Damage from contaminants such as leaded gas, engine coolant, etc
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    Clogging (blocked or plugged)

How long does it last?

If you carry out proper, regular maintenance, the catalytic converter would last for the life your car. Going up to 300,000 miles. But when issues occur, like misfiring causing it to overheat or leaking oil damaging it, it’d hit the dust in no time, even before your car’s odometer clocks 100,000 miles.

It doesn’t exactly have a moving part. Therefore, wear and tear, as is the case with parts having moving components (for instance, the ignition coil), isn’t a concern.

Other Auto Parts

25. AC compressor

Source: http://ricksfreeautorepairadvice.com/car-ac-compressor/

System

Part of the air conditioning system.

What does it do?

It pressurizes (compresses) the refrigerant (coolant) before sending it to the condenser.

What could go wrong?

  • Leaky seals
  • Inadequate lubrication
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    Build-up of dirt and debris

How long does it last?

A/C compressors typically last for the life of a car. In the event that they fail, you wouldn’t have to replace them frequently, as is the case with say your air filter.

26. Accelerator

Category

Pedals. Part of the controls system.

Other names

Gas [pedal], throttle.

What does it do?

As the name suggests, pressing down (depressing) the accelerator pedal makes your car go faster.

What could go wrong?

  • Loose accelerator pedal
  • Worn or damaged throttle cable
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    Bad throttle position sensor
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    Faulty throttle controller
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    Stuck or jammed gas pedal

That said, issues with your car not accelerating when you hit the gas go beyond the throttle. They may be due to other faulty auto components. Say a clogged air filter or air flow meter, a slipping clutch, or a problem with your timing belt.

Therefore, it’s best to seek the services of a mechanic to diagnose your car’s accelerator issues accurately.

How long does it last?

The throttle, like most other car parts, has different components. Most components, such as the throttle controller and throttle position sensor, would remain functional until your car bites the dust.

Some, like the accelerator cable, would give up before then. Although, they’d last for a long time. The accelerator cable, for instance, should go strong for about five years before it’d need changing.

Essential Auto Tools

As a car owner, it is vital to have certain auto tools, for generally the same reason why you’d have a first aid kit or a tool shed. You need to be able to check things out yourself, and if the time allows, carry out some DIY maintenance, repairs, and replacements.

27. Spare tire

Source: https://chryslercapital.com/blog/does-your-new-vehicle-have-a-spare-tire

Okay, so it’s not quite a tool. But, it’s hard to come up with a reason why you shouldn’t have a spare tire in your car at all times.

Source: Photo Credit: http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-a-cordless-drill-to-operate-a-car-Jack/

In the event that you have to change your tire, this unassuming tool would make it happen. It’d lift your car, giving you enough clearance to change the defective tire seamlessly.

Oh, and a car jack or stand is necessary to perform certain maintenance and repairs under your car.

29. Tire pressure gauge

Photo: https://evannex.com/products/precision-tire-pressure-gauge-for-tesla-model-s-and-model-x

In the US, all new vehicles weighing less than 10,000 pounds (5 tons or 4,500 kg) have a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS). Which eliminates the need for a tire pressure gauge.

If your car doesn’t fall within the must-have-TPMS bracket, then you’ll defo want to get a pressure gauge. Its name says it all about its function. It serves the important purpose of preventing flats, keeping your gas usage low, and in the process helping you rack some savings.